Author: sam@eclipsethem.com

Hugh Wunderly started volunteering at Good News Ministries in 2012. At that time his church, Colonial Hills Baptist Church, was sponsoring a program where the kids from Good News came on Sundays. He became familiar with a number of the teens and kids. This was...

By the time Steve came to Good News Ministries, he had shattered every relationship in his life. Friends, family and even his own daughter couldn’t continue living with his addiction to crack cocaine. “I’ve done every kind of hard drug you can name. I spent...

“I never knew what opening my heart to God meant until I came to Good News,” Chad says. Today, he has a great attitude and smile, but admits that wasn’t true for most of his life. Although Chad recalls going to church with his grandparents as...

  Brianna and Kylah are two of the sweetest sisters you could meet. But their lives haven’t exactly been easy. Two years ago their parents separated, causing a lot of confusion and grief for these two girls. After about a year of back and forth between parents,...

My name is Shannon Handy. I am the Men’s Shelter Director at Good News Ministries. I live here in Indianapolis with my beautiful wife, Chastity, and our three wonderful children: Joy (13), Leah (11), and Noah (6). We attend and actively serve the Lord at...

Though only a teenager, 15-year-old Jerenis has been able to experience the power of Christ influencing his life. Jerenis, like many inner-city youth, comes from a single parent home and struggles from the lack of a regular father presence. Some issues he has faced due to his...

This weekend we had 12 teen boys graduate our 40-Day Challenge at our Boys Home. We couldn’t be more proud of how they have grown, become stronger men and given their hearts to God. Through the summer these boys participated in fun activities, hands-on job training, group Bible...

Discipleship among inner-city children who’ve trusted Christ can be extremely difficult for several reasons.   One, most kids come from single-parent, low-income homes. Two, they live in neighborhoods filled with poverty, drugs, gangs & violence. Three, we only have them for a few hours daily. Four, most...